Discounted food steals

Above-average auto-gratuities may signify that employee are attempting to defraud the system. A significant number of voids, cancels, and discounts can point to an employee trying to manipulate the system.

For example, cashiers sometimes void large transactions but still place merchandise in shopping bags for customers. Others ring up only portions of an order to let accomplices walk away with stolen merchandise. In certain cases, even supervisors have been caught helping to cover up employee theft schemes for a portion of the stolen profits.

But the cash register should reflect a high percentage of payments. Instead of a void, items can be transferred from one customer bill to another without numerous voids that may cause an alert.

The Wagon Wheel scheme occurs when the customer is given the check at the end of the meal and pulls out cash to complete the transaction.

But before closing the transaction, the waiter opens a new check, transfers the item often a beverage from the original check to the new one, and then closes out the tab and pockets the cost of the beverage.

With limited access to secured areas, managers may be one of the few people with access to food and supply inventory.

Fortunately, identifying these schemes is getting easier as restaurants use more automated systems to track inventory, integrate with vendor systems, and send alerts to security teams when a red flag is noted. Advanced POS and analytics investments help restaurant owners protect their reputation and profits with an early-warning system that identifies potential managerial fraud.

Not entering received food and supplies into inventory creates an open door for managers to walk out the door with items. BOPIS fraud occurs when someone buys a product online through fraudulent means and returns it to the store in order to gain a gift card to sell online.

This scheme has become an increasing threat to businesses as many stores take on an online presence. Likewise, BOPIS fraud involves fraudulently purchasing a product online, often with a stolen credit card, and picking up the goods at a store.

INR fraud occurs when a customer says their item was never received with the intent of getting a refund or getting a new item. As fraud tactics expand, it becomes increasingly difficult to detect who might be the one harming your store.

Even long-time customers can have ulterior motives. These kinds of fraudsters target businesses with promotions for their customers and specialize in new ways to exploit these offers, especially with younger customers it has become common to abuse discount codes by posting them online and creating email addresses in order to receive new customer discounts.

Discount fraud occurs when an employee or customer purposefully and maliciously deceives or misrepresents fact to apply a discount for personal gain. For example, a customer may purposefully mislead a retailer and claim to qualify for an exclusive discount, like a military discount, even though they have never actually served in the military.

Then, the employee pockets the price difference for themselves. These fraudsters can potentially redeem a coupon more than once, copy coupons, create fake coupons, or use the coupon on unrelated products. Discount abuse occurs when an employee or customer applies a discount inappropriately or in a way that falls outside of policy.

Stacking discounts can be another form of discount abuse. These types of out-of-policy discounts stretch beyond the intended scope of use and will quickly erode margins if left unchecked. Policy and training gaps can often cost retailers more than any thief, fraudster, or dishonest associate.

Proper discount policy creation, distribution, implementation, and training can prevent many instances of fraud and abuse as well as operational issues that can cost retailers millions of dollars annually. In addition to being abused, stacking discount issues ran also be caused by certain policy or technology gaps.

For example, when applying multiple types of discounts to the same transaction, the order in which the discounts are applied can have an impact on the overall cost savings. Weak return policies can be an easy place for fraudsters to strike. Whether it's "friendly fraud" of legitimate buyers requesting a refund but never returning the products or a more considerable effort to defraud a retailer with high-end returns consistently, chargebacks are a growing concern for retailers.

One popular third-party scheme involves purchasing expensive items but returning a cheap knockoff in its place for a full price refund, leaving the retailer on the hook for the merchandise and the payment. Returns of merchandise purchased on fraudulent or stolen tender: Returning goods purchased using falsified or stolen checks, credit cards, or gift cards to purchase 4.

Returns made by Organized Retail Crime ORC groups: Elaborate return schemes orchestrated by teams of professional criminals for profit 5.

Reseller abuse happens when a customer buys an item in bulk with the goal of selling it themselves at an inflated price. With the help of bots, fraudsters have been able to wipe out entire inventories taking away the opportunity for your business to gain any new, legitimate customers.

The pandemic has caused an increase in contactless services in all markets. This has provided an opportunity for self-checkout fraud to rise. A recent study showed that one and five shoppers have stolen from the self-checkout line.

Self-checkout fraud has been underestimated by many retailers and as a result, the self-checkout kiosk has been treated with minimal supervision. Politics Brooks and Capehart Politics Monday Supreme Court. Arts CANVAS Poetry Now Read This. Nation Supreme Court Race Matters Essays Brief But Spectacular.

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Food Theory: Costco DOESN’T Save You Money! You Discounted food steals xteals hundreds Disclunted team members working for your company Free beauty product trial handle cash but by filtering the results there may only be a handful Didcounted match or exceed the Discounted food steals you established - now Discounted non-toxic cleaning products a lot more manageable than trying to stsals at every person. Having noticed that watt and watt bulbs have the same exterior dimensions and come in similar-sized packages, I simply swap them. Ideally, it should be in an aisle that is not easily observed and which contains bulky, rarely-shoplifted merchandise pet food, paper goods. Two-way mirrors are very lightly silvered on the front surface. I make a point of giving a pleasant "Hi, how are you? Original Title How to Steal Food From the Supermarket -Loompanics. Foodservice Aspects of a Comprehensive Foodservice Program.

Discounted food steals - Customers can browse the items through the app, purchase them and pick them up at a local store. Flashfood takes a 25 percent cut. Image. A Buy it Now price: $ $ Buy it Now. Be the first to know about the latest deals directly to your inbox. Thanks for subscribing to Steal a Deal Beds, collars, health supplies, litter, toys, leashes, treats, food, grooming tools, & more! The Steals & Deals promise. Quality Products. We don't sell The Discount Food Box, located at 88 Plaza Court, Groton Shopping Plaza, Groton CT © STEALS & DEALS ALL RIGHTS RESERVED PRIVACY POLICY This site is

Of course, these are just two of many examples where voids are a requirement. Comps on the other hand are used in the restaurant business when the wrong item was delivered or the customer was unhappy with their experience. While these tools are available to make corrections and adjustments as needed — your employees learn quickly that they can just as easily be manipulated to their financial advantage.

Here again, there are a number of ways cash theft can occur, but the focus of this article is on two of the more popular methods — voids and comps. a comp and how each can be used to steal from your restaurant. In the context of point-of-sale and accounting systems, the term void is a transaction which cancels, or deletes entirely, a previously completed transaction.

The distinction is that the transaction being voided is one that was already completed, versus one that is still in the process of being made. NOTE: Depending on your POS system Void may actually be called; Cancel, Over-ring, Delete, Clear, etc.

Voids are a necessity. For example, an employee takes an order and the customer changes their mind and if servers are voiding items that are delivered to the customer instead of recording them as a comp, you will reduce your gross food sales which makes it appear that the sale never happened, and this makes it ideal for theft to occur - let's take a closer look at how that might happen.

Comps are items taken off the bill on products that have been delivered. For example, the wrong drink was made and delivered to the guest. NOTE: Comps may also be called Discounts and depending on how comps are accounted for or not in your accounting system, they can have an impact on your income statement.

Well, as we mentioned earlier, one indicator will be an unexplained increase in your food costs. So, you need more insight before you can successfully put it out. So, the best way to minimize the time needed to detect fraud while maximizing your ability to combat it is by using the data your point-of-sale system makes available check level detail and then combine it with an exception-based reporting technique to narrow the list down to just those who, among your staff cashiers, servers, managers are most likely stealing.

For example, a company may determine that it's unacceptable to have more than 0. You may have hundreds of team members working for your company that handle cash but by filtering the results there may only be a handful that match or exceed the criteria you established - now that's a lot more manageable than trying to look at every person.

As seen in the example above, once the filter is applied to the check detail, a list of individuals who exceed this level the exceptions will be produced.

This limits the number of individuals that will need further review. Why are the exceptions so important? We use red, yellow and green KPI indicators to make it stand out. It keeps the honest people honest. An ROI of 10 times what we were spending on Mirus. You can start by monitoring discounts, voids, over-rings, and any other means your POS system allows money to be removed from a check.

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Even long-time customers can have ulterior motives. These kinds of fraudsters target businesses with promotions for their customers and specialize in new ways to exploit these offers, especially with younger customers it has become common to abuse discount codes by posting them online and creating email addresses in order to receive new customer discounts.

Discount fraud occurs when an employee or customer purposefully and maliciously deceives or misrepresents fact to apply a discount for personal gain. For example, a customer may purposefully mislead a retailer and claim to qualify for an exclusive discount, like a military discount, even though they have never actually served in the military.

Then, the employee pockets the price difference for themselves. These fraudsters can potentially redeem a coupon more than once, copy coupons, create fake coupons, or use the coupon on unrelated products. Discount abuse occurs when an employee or customer applies a discount inappropriately or in a way that falls outside of policy.

Stacking discounts can be another form of discount abuse. These types of out-of-policy discounts stretch beyond the intended scope of use and will quickly erode margins if left unchecked.

Policy and training gaps can often cost retailers more than any thief, fraudster, or dishonest associate. Proper discount policy creation, distribution, implementation, and training can prevent many instances of fraud and abuse as well as operational issues that can cost retailers millions of dollars annually.

In addition to being abused, stacking discount issues ran also be caused by certain policy or technology gaps. For example, when applying multiple types of discounts to the same transaction, the order in which the discounts are applied can have an impact on the overall cost savings.

Weak return policies can be an easy place for fraudsters to strike. Whether it's "friendly fraud" of legitimate buyers requesting a refund but never returning the products or a more considerable effort to defraud a retailer with high-end returns consistently, chargebacks are a growing concern for retailers.

One popular third-party scheme involves purchasing expensive items but returning a cheap knockoff in its place for a full price refund, leaving the retailer on the hook for the merchandise and the payment.

Returns of merchandise purchased on fraudulent or stolen tender: Returning goods purchased using falsified or stolen checks, credit cards, or gift cards to purchase 4. Returns made by Organized Retail Crime ORC groups: Elaborate return schemes orchestrated by teams of professional criminals for profit 5.

Reseller abuse happens when a customer buys an item in bulk with the goal of selling it themselves at an inflated price. With the help of bots, fraudsters have been able to wipe out entire inventories taking away the opportunity for your business to gain any new, legitimate customers.

The pandemic has caused an increase in contactless services in all markets. This has provided an opportunity for self-checkout fraud to rise. A recent study showed that one and five shoppers have stolen from the self-checkout line. Self-checkout fraud has been underestimated by many retailers and as a result, the self-checkout kiosk has been treated with minimal supervision.

While attempting to reduce instances of shoplifting, one retailer discovered that they had sold more carrots than they had ever had in stock. Looking deeper at their transaction data, they also found that some customers were purchasing up to 40lbs of carrots in a single transaction. The Banana Trick was originally discovered by grocers as a clever strategy used by shoplifters where a low-priced item, such as a banana, is manually keyed in or scanned while placing another, high-priced, object onto the scale or into their bags.

This scheme takes advantage of the ignorance of the machine. In other words, the customer scans one item and places it, plus a second unscanned item in the bagging area, or simply walking out with the item still in their cart.

Provided the retailers have weight discrepancy controls in place this will be detected by the self-checkout. The data for interventions can be captured in a good data analytics application. This method involves a little more work before getting to the self-checkout kiosk.

Here the customer removes the price sticker of a lower priced item and sticks it over the barcode of a higher-priced item. Stolen credit cards are an increasing concern in retail, and self-checkout is no different.

When a thief successfully steals a credit card, their first stop is often the nearest store that sells gift cards, including most grocery stores. Account takeovers ATO Nearly every customer has an email-password account combination.

Loyalty Program Data Retailers depend on loyalty programs to attract and grow their customer base. Loyalty and Rewards — New Accounts It has become common for fraudsters to create multiple new accounts to help aid in their fraudulent acts like transferring loyalty or reward program points from one illegally acquired account to a new loyalty or rewards account.

Organized Retail Crime ORC Retail crime is big business, especially if there is a focused effort by a large group of people. Employee Theft Like shoplifters, employees may simply steal inventory items either to keep for themselves or to sell after the fact. Gift Card Scams Gift cards are, in effect, employee-created currency, making gift card theft very difficult to detect.

Unrecorded Sales This type of skimming occurs when an employee completes a transaction without ever ringing it into the POS system. The assortment also includes fun summer accessories like the Solize Sunglasses and hats. Flare safety bracelets are designed to protect women by notifying loved ones if help is needed.

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Flare Safety. It's the retailer's reward for accepting a manufacturer's coupons. If you read the fine print on virtually any grocery cents -off coupon, there is a provision that the retailer must be able to provide documentation that he has actually sold items corresponding to the number of coupons submitted to the manufacturer, or words to that effect.

This is to discourage retailers from clipping coupons and throwing them in with those used by customers to get a few more bucks back. This is an utterly empty threat, and everyone involved knows it. A retailer can submit any reasonable number of coupons absolutely secure in the knowledge that no manufacturer could possibly prove any impropriety.

And at least some retailers do exactly that. It seems petty, given the relatively low value of most coupons, but I've seen store managers routinely dumping handfuls of unused coupons into store safes. That's one reason why retailers don't really much care if you use a coupon for something you didn't buy.

The store submits the coupon anyway, breaks even on what you saved, then makes a small profit on the "handling charge. That's why the date is usually the only thing the cashier checks; and that's why it's the one thing you need to get right.

So, clip those coupons and put them in a coupon file organized by date, and use them. You can use them for products you actually buy, for products you don't buy, or, best of all, both. But they're free, and there's no excuse not to use them.

Chapter 4 Illegal Methods Short of Outright Shoplifting Okay, so far we've dealt with techniques that are legal, or, if illegal, very unlikely to get you in trouble. Now we're going to really break the law.

However, as with the previous chapter, we're still going to consider things short of blatant shoplifting we'll get to that soon enough.

A s mentioned before, you're unlikely to be arrested for anything short of actually carrying shoplifted merchandise out the door, so there's still some measure of safety.

But make no mistake, this stuff, at least theoretically, could get you in trouble. We're going to shoplift out in the open, so to speak. That is, we're going to carry everything we swipe through the checkout lines. We aren't going to conceal anything except the item's real price.

Marking Down Prices Yourself At the store where I work, the butcher marks down meat prices with a red ball point pen. Dented cans are marked down with a broad black Magic Marker. The produce manager slaps new labels over old ones to reduce the price of damaged goods. We've already seen how to deliberately damage merchandise to cause a price reduction.

Let's go one more step and mark it down ourselves. Make note, as I did above, of how different departments mark merchandise down in price.

Carry the appropriate pens and markers into the store and go to work. But before you can assign a new price, you need to eliminate the old one. Again, we can use the modern laser scanner to our benefit. The idea is to prevent the scanner from reading the correct price from the package.

This is normally accomplished by marking through the UPC, or bar code, printed on the package. This is trickier than it sounds. The normal inclination is to draw a thick horizontal line from one end of the bar code to the other. Don't do it, it won't work. The lines that make up the bar code are taller than they need to be.

If you draw a horizontal line across them, perpendicular to the individual lines, you have simply changed one tall bar code into two short ones, both of which can still be read. Instead, make a broad, black vertical mark, parallel to the other lines, but much heavier.

The line needs to be near the center of the code, and broad enough to cover several bars. This is because most bar codes contain redundant information, to permit the bar code reader to double check its reading. Several lines need to be completely obscured to do the trick.

And don't forget that the white spaces between lines are also read by the scanner; obscure at least one.

Now the food container cannot be read by the scanner, and the cashier will be forced out of her normal zombie mode and actually read the label.

You, of course, having previously purchased marked -down merchandise from the department in question, know exactly how it's done. Use the same sort of writing utensil, a similar handwriting style, and a reasonable discount for out-of-date or damaged merchandise.

Each department will have its own style. Don't use the butcher's style to mark down the green beans. It is essential that you not you for it, since it's not a to be challenged and, at the and barred from returning to be seen doing this.

Most stores won't arrest clear-cut case of larceny. But you're likely least, embarrassed. You may be photographed the store. The keys to getting away with this are practice and proper attire. Practice is simple enough. Use labels from items you've bought until it's second nature. As for attire, wear something with long, voluminous sleeves.

Don't worry about the business end of a pen or marker. It's the back end that's most likely to be seen. If you doubt that, simply pick up a pen or pencil and write with it.

Your fingers pretty well hide the tip, right? It's the rest of the marker, moving around in exaggerated circles and slashes, that catches the eye. You'll need a sleeve large and long enough to cover the marker. That's simple in winter weather, but even in summer it can be managed. Use your imagination.

I don't know what you have in your wardrobe; I don't even know your sex. But you probably have, or can purchase, something with long, billowy sleeves. This partial concealment, combined with quickness resulting from practice, will minimize the chances of getting caught.

As with other techniques, don't overdo it. A heaping cart filled with nothing but marked-down items is likely to draw attention. Switching Packages. The development of bar code readers has eliminated the price stickers that used to be on all retail merchandise, so simple price tag switching, so common among shoplifters in the past, is rarely feasible.

But fear not, every system has its weaknesses, and bar code readers are no exception. The bar code system's weakness is, ironically, its perceived strength. The cashiers become lazy and trust it completely.

You can take advantage of that. For example, I like to keep a watt light bulb in my reading lamp. But watt bulbs cost more than lower wattage bulbs.

This has little to do with manufacturing cost, of course. One kind of bulb costs about the same as another to make. The light bulb manufacturers are simply taking advantage of the general perception that more watts ought naturally to cost more. As you may have gathered by now, I disapprove of that sort of profiteering.

Having noticed that watt and watt bulbs have the same exterior dimensions and come in similar-sized packages, I simply swap them. The cashier, in her usual stand-up coma, trusts the "infallible" bar code reader completely.

I pay for a watt bulb and get a watt unit. No sweat. This technique is useful with camera film, cassette tapes, medications and other non-food items often sold in supermarkets. Take a leisurely stroll through your market and take note of various items that can be switched from one container to another.

Happy hunting! I'll bet you'll find plenty. For example, does your grocery store have a grinder for fresh coffee beans? Most do. My favorite store has Eight O'clock brand coffee, which is inexpensive. The same company offers fancier variations, such as Bokar.

Dump the Bokar beans in the grinder bin, pour the Eight O'Clock beans into the Bokar bag and place the Eight O'Clock bag under the grinder. Save an easy buck, and just act innocently befuddled if anyone challenges you.

Some stores also offer really expensive flavored beans for those who can afford them. Mix and match. Have fun. Many egg cartons will accommodate any size egg, from small to jumbo. Under the guise of checking for cracked shells, why not place extra -large eggs in the medium carton?

Slashing Vegetables and Prices Simultaneously If you buy fresh vegetables by the pound, you're familiar with the frustration of paying for the parts you're going to throw away. No problem. Just carry a well-sharpened pocket knife. One quick slash saves you from having to pay for chewy asparagus and b roccoli stems.

Chapter 5 Scamming the Scanner Okay, let's escalate to the next level of larceny. Again, we will target the laser scanner's weak points.

Substitute Bar Codes. Start saving the bar codes from products in your home. The best ones will be printed on thin plastic containers, such as bread bags or the slick paper wrapped around cardboard boxes. Additionally, they should be from inexpensive items, say, two dollars or less.

Use a glue stick to coat the backs of the bar codes with adh esive, then stick them to a sheet of wax paper.

The wax should keep them from adhering very tightly to the paper, allowing you to peel off pre-glued bar codes as needed in the store. Peel the bar code off your wax paper and completely cover the product's real code.

Two factors make this method a bit more dangerous than those in the previous chapters. One, if you're caught, acting confused won't help.

The piece of wax paper with attached bar codes will prove your guilt. Most stores will prosecute you. Second, the cash register display will not only indicate the lower price, it will also identify the product by name. This doesn't necessarily mean your methods will be discovered.

After all, lots of things could cause the improper reading, including an improperly programmed scanner or an improperly encoded piece of merchandise. But if someone notices that several items in your cart carry phony bar codes, you're likely to be thrown out or even arrested.

For that reason, it's best to use this technique with a cashier who knows what you're doing, but doesn't care. This is much simpler than it sounds. Cashiers are usually high school kids, retirees or poorly educated people. What they have in common is a willingness to tolerate abysmal pay and long hours of standing in one position.

If you get a chance to talk with one of the cashiers in reasonable privacy, it's easy to get her I use the feminine pronoun because most cashiers are women to complain about her pay and working conditions.

Now is the time to tell her what you're doing with the fake bar codes. Since her ox isn't being gored she can always claim she didn't notice the scam and since it is the store and its overpaid managers who qualify for profit-sharing getting ripped off, she won't care what you're doing. If you and a cashier have an understanding you may want to pay her a modest mo nthly bribe , she can "slide" some of your merchandise for you.

Instead of dragging your purchases over the scanner's window, she slides them around the side of it. No purchase is rung up and the item costs you nothing.

As with other scams, don't overdo this one. Cashiers who slide a lot get caught believe me, the security guard isn't just watching the customers. Ideally, she should slide only a small number of your purchases, preferably the most expensive ones.

Scanner Subtraction If your cashier is a bit of a risk-taker, there are a couple of variations on the sliding scam. The cashier can go ahead and scan the product, then scan it a second time after hittin g a button on her register. This tells the register to delete the previous input.

The registers have this capability because the scanners sometimes scan the same item twice, overcharging the customer. Every system has a method of quickly subtracting the second scan, and it can be used to help you steal food. Phony Coupon Another approach available from a friendly cashier is the phony discount coupon.

With this approach, she scans the item you're buying then quickly scans the bar code on a cents-off coupon she keeps handy for friends. Even though you didn't have a coupon for that item, most systems will register the discount anyway.

A good cashier can do this so quickly the eye literally can't catch it in action. The Risks These systems that rely on a friendly cashier are not entirely foolproof. They can be detected if the cashier in question is already under suspicion for helping her buddies.

In most stores there is an inconspicuous display screen in the manager's office. Management can use the screen to monitor activity at any of the store's registers.

If the manager sees you buy a box of powdered milk, but his screen identifies it as a loaf of house-brand bread, he'll figure out something's wrong. You may be arrested, and if he suspects complicity on the part of the cashier, she'll be fired.

If you claim innocence in court, the manager or arresting officer will produce a second, back -up receipt produced by the store's computer. You will be convicted. None of this is meant to frighten you; the cashiers almost never get caught helping anyone. It's just a reminder to be careful.

It's much safer to obtain the cooperation of a cashier who's worked at the store long enough to be trusted. The cashiers who get the most scrutiny are those recently hired, especially if they get frequent visits from friends hanging around the store.

Those are the cashiers to avoid. Chapter 6 Full-Fledged, Hard-Core, Stick-It-In-Your-Pants-And-Walk-Out-The-Door Shoplifting. If the previously discussed methods of reducing your food bill seem insufficient, let's get on to some serious, stuff-it-in-your-pants shoplifting.

The food will be free, you won't need to bribe a cashier or swap bar codes. On the other hand, getting caught often means going to jail. The mechanics of shoplifting, that is, where you stuff your loot and so forth, are relatively unimportant although we'll discuss them.

The important thing is to draw no attention to yourself in the process. The Basics Now is the time to commit to heart Anderson's First Law of Shoplifting: NEVER POCKET OR CONCEAL AN ITEM NEAR ITS SHELF LOCATION.

If you plan to shoplift a steak, for example, put the steak in your cart and keep it there until you're far away from the meat counter. Any security personnel will watch the meat display for meat thieves.

If you place the steak in your cart, you'll look innocent. Go to an aisle with tough-to-shoplift stuff, like paper towels and toilet paper.

Then conceal the steak; no one will be expecting you to do it there. This brings us to Anderson's Second Law of Shoplifting: NEVER STEAL THE PACKAGE IF ITS CONTENTS CAN BE STOLEN.

This applies primarily to the HBAs, as the health and beauty aids aisle is called. For example, let's say you want to steal a tablet bottle of Advil. Put the Advil, in its box, in your cart and move to another aisle in accordance with Anderson's First Law, of course.

Then pull the bottle out of the box, conceal the bottle and discard the box. If you're caught and searched, no one can prove the Advil came from that store. You can claim you always carry Advil because you get migraine headaches. Finally, let's consider Anderson's Third Law of Shoplifting: NEVER SHOPLIFT ANYTHING YOU CANT AFFORD TO BUY.

This lends credibility to your claim that you intended to pay for the item, but simply forgot. In addition, some stores don't want to bother with too many minor shoplifting cases. They may let you off if you pay for what you took. Dress for Success Where should you hide your booty?

The answer depends on your physical build, your gender, what you're stealing, and, most importantly, the weather. The weather? Yes, indeed. Large outer garments are ideal for concealing what you've stolen.

But if the weather is warm and dry, a big coat will have the security people watching your every move. That's no exaggeration. who comes into my store assume he's a thief and around.

I'll follow his bathroom. On a nice day, there's almost always some clown dressed for backpacking in Alaska. I immediately make no attempt to be subtle about following him every step in the store, including a visit to the. If I don't see him steal anything, but I'm still suspicious, I'll "bumpfrisk" him.

That is, I'll "accidentally" bump into him and, while apologizing for my clumsiness, pat my hands up and down both sides of his coat, especially the pockets.

If I find something, he's going to jail. The good shoplifter dresses for his trade, but never wears clothing obviously unsuited for the current weather. A coat in summer might as well be a neon sign reading "I'm shoplifting. An enormous amount of merchandise can be taken this way, and you're relatively unlikely to be spotted, provided the coat's exterior looks normal.

In this case, it helps to be fat. No one wants to embarrass an overweight person with questions about lumpy clothing. In warm weather, it's a bit trickier. One common technique is to dress casually, with your shirt tail hanging out. Wide flat items, such as wrapped cuts of steak, can be concealed in your pants waistline.

Carry the steak to another aisle Law No. Let your shirt tail fall naturally back into place. With practice, the whole thing can be done in less than a second, and the shirt tail hides any telltale bumps. If you're a woman, carry a large purse.

But don't carry a huge purse. Really oversized purses attract unwanted attention just as effectively as a down parka in July. The primary advantage of purses is that women normally carry certain items in their purses, and the presence of such items proves nothing, provided the outer containers have been removed See Law No.

Be sure to leave your purse slightly open while shopping. A purse that's constantly being opened and closed will draw attention. Lipstick, cold medicine, aspirin and the like can safely be placed in your purse, eve n if you're searched.

Searches And being female, by the way, makes it much less likely you'll be searched. That's because most security guards and store managers are male. It's no secret in the security business that women routinely claim they were sexually fondled during a search. No man wants to be accused of something that embarrassing, no matter how ludicrous the charge.

If you're a woman and a man does search you, by all means accuse him of fondling you. Scream loudly, so others in the store c an hear you, "Get your hands off my breasts, you pervert!

If you act sufficiently indignant, you're unlikely to be charged, even if they find stolen merchandise. Cigarettes Probably the most common target of shoplifters is cigarettes. If you smoke, you should never have to buy another pack in your life. The reason, of course, is that virtually all male smokers carry a pack or two in the breast pocket of their shirts, and female smokers carry a couple in their purses.

As long as no one sees the pack go from shopping cart to shirt pocket, nothing can be proved. Be aware, however, that in a few states different stores affix different colored tax stamps on the packs.

If your pack can be traced to the store you're shopping in, don't claim you bought it at the gas station around the corner. Say you bought it in this store, sometime yesterday. The pack of smokes can simply be dropped into your pocket or purse, as discussed above. Again, keep Anderson's First Law in mind: Never move the cigarettes from the display directly into your purse or pocket.

Wait until you're in another aisle. In the unlikely event you get caught, claim that you stuck them in your pocket or purse out of habit, and meant to pay for them. The explanation is sufficiently plausible to get you off, even if you have to go to trial. But don't get greedy. The only cigarette thieves I've caught who were subsequently convicted in court were people who tried to steal several packs.

Anything beyond two packs is likely to get you in trouble. Using the Restroom Any store that permits shoppers more or less free access to the restrooms is an easy mark. You can carry a small basket of merchandise into the restroom, lock yourself in a stall, then transfer some of the loot into pockets or purse.

Some items can be consumed on the spot. I frequently find candy wrappers and empty beer cans in the restrooms. Furthermore, access to the bathrooms also may mean easy access to the back stockrooms, where no one is likely to be watching you.

It never hurts to ask a store employee if you may use their restroom. If the answer is yes, make frequent use of it. Carrying a Container Another tactic worth considering is carrying an innocent-looking container to hold small shoplifted items.

Some stores won't let you carry packages inside, and the package may serve only to draw u nwanted observation. But it sometimes works. My store, for example, is next door to a videotape rental shop.

Our patrons routinely carry the boxes into the grocery store. If the movie cassette has already been removed, the box is big enough to carry a few small items out of the store.

Using a Confederate Should you and a friend shoplift as a team? It depends. Using a confederate makes some techniques easier, but may also draw unwanted attention. The best approach to "tag-team" shoplifting is to pretend to be shopping separately, using separate grocery carts.

One of you is the "nest builder," the other is the pick-up man. If done properly, this tactic is very hard to detect. The term "nest" is security slang for a collection of items to be pick ed up and shoplifted at a later time. It is a natural extension of Anderson's First Rule of Shoplifting.

Here's how it works: You and your buddy agree in advance where the nest will be planted. Ideally, it should be in an aisle that is not easily observed and which contains bulky, rarely-shoplifted merchandise pet food, paper goods,.

You move through the store putting items in your cart, including small valuable items you intend to steal. Steer your cart to the pre-arranged site and build your nest. Then hide it from casual shoppers by placing an article from that aisle's stock in front of the nest.

Continue through the store and purchase a few cheap articles. Ten minutes later, your partner, who didn't put any easily-shoplifted items in his cart, and therefore has attracted no attention to himself, arrives at the nest site.

He pockets the contents of the nest and leaves. He may want to purchase a few small items on the way out. If the nest site is sufficiently hidden from casual view, this is a very tough tactic to beat. The nest-building technique can, of course, be used by one person alone.

Hide the merchandise now, return an hour later to pick it up. It's safer than more blatant forms of shoplifting, but still more risky than working with a friend. When a person routinely pays more than one visit a day to my store, I get suspicious.

A Final Word A final word about shoplifting: If you think you've been spotted, or that a security guard may be following you, dump your loot.

Most store s won't prosecute anyone who doesn't actually carry the merchandise out of the store. Merely concealing or moving merchandise inside the store may legally constitute shoplifting, but prosecution is unlikely if you ditch the evidence. Chapter 7 Don't Look Like a Shoplifter The security people can't watch everyone, so they keep an eye on shoppers who look suspicious.

Your goal, as a professional food thief, is to look as little like a shoplifter as possible. Let's look at who catches my eye. Groups of People Normal folks shop alone, or with a spouse. Nothing gets my attention faster than a group of four or five people, especially if they're all young or of the same sex.

Peer pressure is a very real thing, especially among teenagers. I know plenty of regular shoppers who cause no problem when alone, but become so obnoxious in the presence of their peers that I'm frequently forced to throw them out. Additionally, it's a fairly common shoplifting technique to form a huddle of people around the one concealing the merchandise.

This generally works, since I'm not going to challenge someone unless I'm absolutely certain he's carrying. But in the long run, it's a lousy technique. I may not catch you today, but I know you're a thief and I'll get yo u eventually.

Shoplift alone or in the company of someone who can pass as your spouse. It's an unfortunate fact that I catch a disproportionate number of shoplifters, despite trying to keep an eye on suspicious people of colors. This may be a result of the neighborhoods my store serves. store stands exactly between a black neighborhood with an epidemic drug and alcohol trouble, and a fairly affluent, mostly white neighborhood.

There's nothing you can do about your skin color, of course. But you can pick your store with an eye to blending in. If you're white, shoplift in a store patronized primarily by whites.

If you're black, hispanic or whatever, shoplift in a store whose clientele most resembles you. Attitude If you've obviously got a chip on your shoulder, don't blame me if I follow your every step. I make a point of giving a pleasant "Hi, how are you?

If the response is a nose in the air, I get pissed off. You don't want to piss off the gua rd. Again, there is a racial angle to this. Let me say that I'm no racist. If I were young and black, I'd be just as angry and just as contemptuous of white men in cop uniforms as many of my shoppers seem to be.

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